What is drop pitch?

Drop pitch is the rate and level of how much an instrument starts to vibrate.

The more you raise the pitch (i.e. the more fast a string is vibrating, the greater drop.

There are 3 basic types of drop pitch.

1) “Low”

2) “High”

3) “Very “high”

This is your standard stringed instrument.

If you find a string vibrating very slow, you might want to adjust it:

Low pitch = Fret not in middle range

High pitch = Fret in middle range

Very high = Fret in lower range and in the 3-4 frets

Some stringed instruments use their low or high pitch as a filter. For example, a violin has two sets of low frets where the high and low frets vary in pitch: one set where you want the pitch to be very low (F1), and one set where you want the pitch to be very high (F2). The difference is because the high frets are slightly below the bass frequencies of the strings. So if you play a violin where the low frets are F1 and F2 – the strings are not very far apart.

This is a great option if you play very fast. If you need to get a certain note in a string – drop it just a little lower than what you want.

These strings vibrate more quickly.

You may want to make them slightly slow or very slow so that there is some pitch variation but not a lot:

These strings can produce some of the most exciting timbres that are produced by these instruments.

What type of strings do you get?

It depends on the instrument and the player.

Some stringed instruments come with a choice of various strings from the same manufacturer:

Bass

Middle

Low

Middle

Low

Middle

Low

These strings are a bit faster than Bass.

Bass string

In the UK, strings called Bass have a lower pitch than the other types of string. Bass tends to have slightly less decay and it has a faster speed.

Auto-Tune - Wikipedia
Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Middle

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

A Middle